New Kindex Feature Release Today

New Kindex Feature Release Today

We are excited to announce the release of a major update to Kindex archival software, with several new features that will make creating your searchable family archive faster and easier.  We’ve maximized space, improved archive organization, and enhanced record navigation and transcription. Check out the updates below or watch our Kindex Feature Update video.

Organize & Browse Your Archive

  • Enjoy an expanded viewing area for your records
  • Access tools to add, filter, move, and delete records
  • Click a record to view or edit (add a transcription, description, or metadata). Note removal of “Transcribe” on record thumbnail. Purple checkmarks indicate indexing is complete.
  • View All Records or Indexed Records
  • View your archive record total and indexing progress

Manage Your Collections

  • View Collection record totals
  • Organize your Collections by using Sub-Collections
  • Use collections to filter your record views or search
  • Hover over record number to edit or move Collections

View & Transcribe Records

Navigate your Archive

  • When a record is open, you can view and edit records consecutively with new new navigation buttons above the record
  • The same navigation buttons appear below,  along with a Save button
  • A button under the transcription shows indexing progress as Complete or In Progress. When a transcription is done, click the “Read it!” link to read the completed transcription

We hope you enjoy this update. Let us know what you think!

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Kindex Archive Essential Features

Kindex Archive Essential Features

Many Kindex users have asked us, “What exactly do I get when I sign up for Kindex?” We’re glad you asked! Here’s a summary of all our key features.

Create Your Cloud or Closet Archive

  • Kindex Cloud archive is a publicly accessible archive. Cloud owners may invite Collaborators to add or index records. Guests must have a free, “Kindexer” account to index records.
  • Kindex Closet archive is a private, invite-only archive. Closet owners may invite Collaborators to add or index records. It is only accessible and searchable to the archive owner and invited Collaborators
  • All archives receive a custom subdomain, can add unlimited records, and may invite unlimited collaborators
  • Archive backed by Amazon Web Services.

Gather Your Records

  • Add unlimited records (jpg, png, pdf up to 15MB each)
  • Import Memories from FamilySearch.
  • Individual or batch uploads

Collaborate with Others

  • Invite unlimited friends and family to access the archive, free
  • Collaborators can search, add, and index records
  • Unite records scattered among various households or locations
  • Create a crowdsourced indexing project (public archives only)

Share Your Records

Share records & transcriptions with anyone on a custom page

Add Data to Your Records

  • Add searchable metadata (title, description, keywords, etc.) in single records or in batches
  • Add a transcription with our built-in transcription tools
  • Add tags for people, places, and events

Search Your Records

  • Easily and quickly search every word of your archive
  • Search includes metadata and transcriptions

Archive Tools

  • Download your archive data as a CSV or XLS file
  • Download your archive records as a ZIP file
  • Print individual transcriptions as QR-Coded PDFs
  • View record totals and indexing stats

Support

  • Free customer support
  • Free training

 

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Transforming Family History Through Metadata & Transcription

Transforming Family History Through Metadata & Transcription

If a family record can’t be discovered, searched, or shared, what value is it? How do we rescue our family records and transform them into a family archive that reaches beyond the walls of our own home and into the hearts of countless others?

Engaging our families through searchable archives is our primary mission at Kindex. Check out our five essential steps that add value to records and bring families one step closer to getting face-to-face with their own history.

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1. Gather your records for scanning. Take an inventory of what you have, start with a small project (think shoebox-sized), and get scanning.

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2. Add your digitized records to an online database. Google and Dropbox are great, but consider tools like Kindex that offer collaborative and indexing tools. After all, what good are digitized records if no one can access or search them? 

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3. Add metadata to your records. In Kindex, this can be done on-the-fly when uploading records in batch mode, making it quick and easy to get records searchable.

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4. Transcribe your records. While you can do this in a word processing program, adding transcriptions in Kindex is easy and keeps the indexed data attached to the original record.

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5. Add tags for names, dates, and places. (Note: our tagging tool is temporarily offline while we make some improvements.)

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Are you ready to rescue your history?

Get started on Kindex today to take advantage of unlimited records and collaborative tools that will get your records out of the closet and into the hearts of your family everywhere. 

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Family letters: Opening the door to our ancestor’s lives

Family letters: Opening the door to our ancestor’s lives

If a photo is a window into a family’s life, then a letter is the door. This 1904 portrait of the Emma Woolley and Charles Rich Clark family is beautiful, but offers few clues about the challenges, personalities and relationships between these family members.

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Today, we transcribed a letter written by Emma Woolley to her husband Charles Rich Clark while he was away serving a church mission in 1892.  In this letter we learn that Emma had a migraine, and that the oldest child, Marion, was the serious one who concerned himself with his mother’s help and offered a little prayer on her behalf. We learn that Vernon, the next oldest, was the silly one and said funny things that made his mother and neighbors laugh. We learned how devoted Emma is as a wife, managing the family accounts, nurturing sick children, doing laundry,  and settling debts. She closes the letter saying,

“I guess this is not what would be called a love letter but it is written in love all the same, and I am proud of the man I love, and hope to keep ever fresh and alive that affection that exists between us”

To read the full transcription, go to the Ezra T. Clark Family Archive.

Make insights like this possible with your own family records and start your own family archive.

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