Ellsworth to Dorothy, 1 August 1932

Ellsworth to Dorothy, 1 August 1932

From the Dorothy Smith Clark Archive, a letter from Ellsworth Clark to Dorothy Smith, 1 August 1932.

Dear Pal Dorothy,

Here it is August. Soon it will be September again. After all it seems as though the summer is slipping right along.

Well, you got it back on me last Friday. When I went to the PO for the mail Mr. Bacon asked me if a letter was worth 3 more cents. I had a very good idea it was so I purchased the necessary dime and then with the 7 cents remaining I bought lickoric liq licorice (How do you spell it!) Imagine how I looked in about 10 minutes. Just like any little kid whose dad has given him a nickel.

You remember in a recent letter to you I mentioned that there was still snow visible on our peaks. Well, today I looked and could just make out one small streak on a deep north slope.

I did not work today. It rained yesterday and wet the hay so that we will not be able to start until about noon tomorrow. This morning I stayed in bed until almost eight o’clock. (lazy thing) When I did get up my mother and sister Iris and myself went out into our old home and cleaned it up. It’s funny how things get accumulated. Old clothes, school books, papers, newspapers, magazines, mail etc. seemed to have piled up in the last year. We made a bon fire and got rid of most of it. There was also lot of odds and ends which we removed from our store before we sold it. I’ll bet there was a million safety pins, lots of snaps and hooks and eyes, a gross or so of shoe laces, a few old fashioned shirts and OH so many old hair nets.

Yesterday I went to Sunday School and got into an argument with Mildred Munk on predestination and also on what constitutes a Master Minds. We couldn’t finish it in class so I went down to her place, (almost next door) and we finished it and also had a good dinner. Mrs Munk had just started to pick her second crop of strawberries. I never ate so many strawberries in my life, I believe, Mildred asked me about School at the U of U. She has almost decided to not go to the JC at Logan next year. I really believe it would be better for her to keep going where she has started. She mentioned she would like to know you and wishes you could come up here and then you and I and Leonard Bacon and herself could have a very good time.

I wish you could have gone to Canada this time, as you would have been pretty sure to get back before school started. A rest and change of climate would do you good. You could miss the hot vacation of SLC and then get back when it has started to cool off. You and Marv could see a lot of old friends and have a regular good time.

Now you mention it, I have, once or twice, called Gert. ‘trudy’. Sometime this summer I believe I’ll write to her. Surprise her I’ll bet. She wouldn’t expect such a thing from me.

When you mention your trip to Millcreek, I feel like I’ve missed out on something. I really believe I know the cabin you speak of. When our Botany Class went up there we found one just like you describe. It was up a small branch of the canyon. After going up (about 2 or 3 miles I guess) you step in a slight opening in the canyon and then there is an old road go up the left side of the canyon. Then up the branch about ¾ of a mile is such a cabin with two of the sides knocked out. However, I didn’t notice any upper story. But then I didn’t look very closely.

When you mention how you climbed hills and steep cliffs etc. I could just tell it was you for sure. I’ll bet you were the ring leader and just a bit daring. I’ll not forget how you stood on the points of rock while we were on the way to ‘Timp’ cave.

Honestly you just about scared me when you stood out there. What if you had slipped what would I have done then. No Dot next year and well what would have been the use of anything.

I think Hazel is coming up for about two weeks. Very probably it will be in about 3 or 4 weeks. She is getting a months lay off and a 10% cut in wages. Tough! I what. She’s luck to hold her job I guess. There have been so many laid off completely. 16 of the waitresses were ‘canned’. Just at the time she wrote. She is going to have one of here girl friends come up here with her. I guess she is older than herself and I believe a widow. And oh! So uninteresting I would think she would find an exciting one to bring up. You for instance. I think Andrew will bring her up, as he has his vacation at about the same time. I wonder how Helen will get along all alone. She really should have someone to stay with her on the go and stay with one of her friends. I am welcome to think she will do the latter.

I can tell by the wild flowers you sent that you were quite high in the mountains, as only those grow there at this time of the year. They were still beautiful.

Who says you are not a poet? It sounds like you and is good enough so I wonder if I should even try any more myself. I wish I could believe that you even though of me slightly, when you wrote it. If I though that were true I’d be just about the happiest fellow in this little old universe.

Gee, if I could step into some summer league I’d be seeing you in about a jiffy. I’d just quit this old letter and tell it to you personally. Somehow it’s not apt to get twisted as it might on paper. I often get of into so world of fantasy while going about my work and when I do I think up some of the greatest and amusing situations. Sometimes I am a fellow with a sudden gift of $10,000.00 and I figure out what I’d do with it. Then I’m in SLC and talking with you. Then we’re going on a hike somewhere and I’m seeing your home after a perfect evening. Sometimes I’m a successful Dr. again I’m a School Teacher. Oh. I guess I’m somewhat of a dreamer.  Anyway, most of my dreams cluster around a certain little Girl at 474 E 4th S. She is to me the sweetest girl I can imagine just sensible enough not to be too flippant and just romantic enough to be interesting and extremely desirable. Oh Dot, I think of you in all my work. You just seem to pop up wherever I am and whatever I’m doing. Even though I’m busy and not able to write quite so often as I did I think of us often and with more real appreciation. At first it was sort of a devoid feeling I felt mostly because of my many evenings and days with you. It was a direct change in my way of living. Now I’m somewhat over that. I still am lonely but I’m realizing what it means to be a pal to you and be in your company. A deeper appreciation I believe. It’s surely the foundation for a very close friendship. I realize now that it is not a common infatuation or a short romance. If it were ever that it has changed into something which I want to keep and what means everything to me.

Holy Mackerel, I was going to write to Weldon and still I haven’t. It seems you take all my extra time besides my extra thoughts. You shouldn’t be so interesting and then I could write to someone else. OH I can I guess, but I just seem to never get around to doing it.

Are you getting acquainted around your neighborhood now? I suppose you will be staying there in your present plan all winter won’t you? I wish we could both be in Capitol Hill Ward again. I’m not sure but I think I will try to get an apartment in the same war as last year.

There was something important I was wanting to ask you yesterday, and now for the life of me I can’t remember what it was. If I think of it I’ll write again soon.

Now for the old bed and dreams of you.

Ellsworth.

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Love Letters Part III—Love Realized

Love Letters Part III—Love Realized

[Dorothy and Ellsworth become engaged in the Spring of 1933, yet the are still spending summers apart while Ellsworth works in Idaho, and then later when he serves a six-month mission in Colorado. -Cathy]

[Ellsworth to Dorothy, 29 July 1933]
It is evening. The earth is fresh and green from the summers first rain. The sun has set but it is still light so as to see better the soft dewy foliage. It is sweet. The air is so clean and pure it is as if everything was in a preparedness of some sort. I’ll bet it’s just waiting for a lovely Miss Smith who is going to come and visit me for awhile. Yes, I can see her coming. He hair is back over her shoulders and the wind is blowing through it. Her lips are parted and a smile is a welcome to me. She is on her tiptoes and her arms are partly reaching to me in welcome. Her eyes are as stars, yet they shine with no glaring light, rather it is a soft brown glow that speaks of love, acknowledgement, trust and unending spirit. Is she going to get here? It is growing dusk. I’ll go meet her and taking her into my arms, press her gently to me.

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[Ellsworth to Dorothy, 15 December 1933]
Dearest—
Just a note at this late hour to tell you I have not forgotten you and that I’m still alive and happy. The stars seem so low and bright tonight that I yearn for your company. This is truly a beautiful country and the only thing to make it more perfect would be— (you know who).

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[Ellsworth to Dorothy 29 December 1933]
Dearest Little Starlet,
I’m oozing with sentiment tonight. The moon is full and my thoughts run tenderly along such lines as boat rids on a lagoon, walks in the park when it’s just chilly enough for the arm of your loved one to warm  you, and skating on crystal clear ice with a sweetheart on my arm as the cold blue white stars wink and fall in the frosty sky. Then thoughts go back to June nights when the air is burdened with sweet perfume of big copper colored roses and lilac. When grass and ground invites you to linger and muse and in silence wonder at the handiwork of God & his goodness to Man. Two lovers are in bliss as they feel more than they can say, and when the kiss of the betrothed is as a sacrament for themselves, to a greater power than Man. Dreaming of days to come when service and love shall know no bounds and two shall be as one. Blessed children and blessed old age; even death is then beautiful.

It is beautiful tonight. Old Pikes Peak in majestic stillness is in communion with the stars & trees. It is quiet. The noise of city life is not near and as I look out in the dark, it seems you are near. See— I’m talking to you now. I’ll tell you how I love you if you don’t leave. This may seem foolish but you are near. And I know of a surety of my love for you.

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[Ellsworth to Dorothy, 22 February 1934]
“Did you ever see a dream walking? Well, I did” [sketch of musical notes] etc. I saw that a number of times while a good member of the Capitol Hill Ward. Remember the times when we went walking after church. Also, how I could walk home with you from Sunday School & make a date for the evening. I can’t do that now but I can see you walking in dreams. I see you often as I remember you the times we got up early and went up some canyon. Remember the morning we walk up towards Parleys Canyon, and I kissed you right out on the prairie (I mean your mouth). Excuse me I don’t know my anatomy. What I meant to say was: we were standing out on the prarie [sic] in plain view of everybody for miles around, and I kissed, you. You see it was so early the people around were not up yet.

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Love Letters Part II—Missing Dorothy

Love Letters Part II—Missing Dorothy

[Ellsworth to Dorothy 9 July 1932]
As I sit here all alone I wonder what you are doing now. Are you having a good time! I hope so because it would compensate in some measure for the wonderful time I’m having. Wonderful – like fun.

Tonight while near the Union Pacific line irrigating No. 18 (Fast Mail & Passenger) came tearing down the track. It was dark but the coaches were ablaze with light and I could see in through the windows. I imagined I could see happy travelers waiting to meet some special friend. I could see lovers as they planned. But soon the “creeper” is gone. With a shrill whistle and a last flash of red light I am left alone. I look up in the sky. There is a half moon there –  a star falls – I do not have time to say, “Money! Money!” Hmm – a half moon – 28 more days before another one – two more after that then —— then snow, school, work. Snow. Snowflake – the place where Dot was born one & twenty years ago. Twenty  one year [sic] ago. Twenty one years ago I was three years old. What did I know of love then – no more idea that Dot was a squealing red faced little baby then that there was any world outside of my door-yard. Hmmm mighty funny – darn funny. Now I know her but can’t see her for – OH such a long time. But then what matters time. Reward, reward, desire – reward? Desire? I desired a letter this Saturday night but will probably be rewarded with one when a few more days have passed. I thought she was foolin when she said a letter in a few weeks. Hope she was.  I desire – hope wish for one Monday. If not Monday then I may get one Tuesday. Think I’ll keep this crazy epistle around until then. If I got one Tues then sent it off. You see I would not like to bore her with too much of this sort of stuff.

Midnight – soon the kids from town will be home from the dance in Bennington. Couldn’t go up because I had to work late. Have to look out or  I’ll forget how to dance or dress up for a young lady – best not to anyway, I guess. […] The radio is now transmitting “Extraordinary Girl” a minute ago it (orchestra) played “I love you truly”. It might have gone on and played “I miss a little Miss” and then the later hit that says something about “summer coming on and not girl to be had” – can’t get it just right. AW Rats.

[…] That was a grand letter you wrote last. I received it yesterday afternoon and was tickled nearly pink. It’s funny how I begin to wonder about things and worry for fear you’ve forgotten me if I don’t hear from you for a few days. I wondered all sorts of things. I even wondered if I should not write so often, but after getting your letter I decided to keep on writing but that perhaps I’d better cut down on the salutations & endings. I really mean them but if you think they are not proper I’ll have to let you hold me down a bit. I guess it’s because I’ve never used them before and I really wanted to and though perhaps you wouldn’t care. I hope you don’t think it was flattery. I detest such stuff. It is merely the way I feel. Forgive me.

I take your letters too seriously? Sometimes I think that you do not mean some things at least, not the way I take them. […] This is what I felt more like saying. Goodbye to the sweetest girl I’ve ever known.
Love, Ellsworth

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[Ellsworth to Dorothy 1 August 1932]
I can tell by the wild flowers you sent that you were quite high in the mountains, as only those grow there at this time of the year. They were still beautiful.

Who says you are not a poet? It sounds like you and is good enough so I wonder if I should even try any more myself. I wish I could believe that you even though of me slightly, when you wrote it. If I though that were true I’d be just about the happiest fellow in this little old universe.

Gee, if I could step into some summer league I’d be seeing you in about a jiffy. I’d just quit this old letter and tell it to you personally. Somehow it’s not apt to get twisted as it might on paper. I often get of into so world of fantasy while going about my work and when I do I think up some of the greatest and amusing situations. Sometimes I am a fellow with a sudden gift of $10,000.00 and I figure out what I’d do with it. Then I’m in SLC and talking with you. Then we’re going on a hike somewhere and I’m seeing your home after a perfect evening. Sometimes I’m a successful Dr. again I’m a School Teacher. Oh. I guess I’m somewhat of a dreamer.  Anyway, most of my dreams cluster around a certain little Girl at 474 E 4th S. She is to me the sweetest girl I can imagine just sensible enough not to be too flippant and just romantic enough to be interesting and extremely desirable. Oh Dot, I think of you in all my work. You just seem to pop up wherever I am and whatever I’m doing. Even though I’m busy and not able to write quite so often as I did I think of us often and with more real appreciation. At first it was sort of a devoid feeling I felt mostly because of my many evenings and days with you. It was a direct change in my way of living. Now I’m somewhat over that. I still am lonely but I’m realizing what it means to be a pal to you and be in your company. A deeper appreciation I believe. It’s surely the foundation for a very close friendship. I realize now that it is not a common infatuation or a short romance. If it were ever that it has changed into something which I want to keep and what means everything to me.

___________________________________

[Ellsworth to Dorothy 7 September 1932]
We drove from home Monday morning to Twin Falls. There we stayed at the camp ground & then this morning we came to the present place. I hope this letter reached you so that you can get a letter of to Grant’s Pass Oregon. It would tickle me pink to get one while there. Sort of make me remember you and good times past. I’m the future Goodness only knows I think about you a lot anyway. Sometimes I wonder along funny lines of thought. Especially when I did not hear from you for so long a time. Believe me I was glad when I cam home from work last Friday and your letter was waiting for me. I surely thought you had forgotten me.

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Dorothy (right) stands with friend Evelyn at the North Temple Wall in Salt Lake City, Utah.

Love Letters Part I: Early Days

Love Letters Part I: Early Days

For Valentine’s Day Weekend, we’re posting our favorite excerpts from our archive of love letters between Dorothy Smith and Ellsworth M. Clark. It’s 1932, and their relationship is quite young and unsettled. Ellsworth, on summer break in his hometown of Idaho, emerges as the lovesick but hopeful partner, while the playful Dorothy doesn’t seem quite  ready to settle down. —CathyDSC-dancecard-1932

Detail from Dorothy Smith Clark scrapbook. Dorothy’s dance card from a Capitol Hill Ward dance from February 1932.

[Ellsworth to Dorothy, 24 June 1932,]
[…] It’s funny how a fellow reads things into letters. When I sat down to write your letter seemed the best ever and the more I read it the more I read into it. I guess I had better put it away and read it again when in better humor.

I wish I could see  you tonight and talk to you . I’ve so much to say that will seem funny on paper. I’m afraid I’m a pretty poor correspondent card You might read things into it also. Then let’s hope that I’ll get better in my writing, become I guess its improbable that I’ll see you soon. Oh, Dot. Now here I am getting ‘blue’ etc. I’ll cut this rotten letter short and hope that the next one is very much better. Auf wiedersehen to the sweetest girl in the whole world.
Repentantly
Ellsworth

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[Ellsworth to Dorothy, 6 July 1932]
[…]There is still a wonderful Indian Summer and Fall coming. There are places to go when the snow is on the ground also. You see I haven’t known you when we could have gone skating, sleighing, skiing, etc. What fun we’ll have if we can get together often enough. Well now that’s figuring a long time ahead, but then I like to dream of anything with wish I may associate your presence. No foolin’.
[…]
I wonder if they can’t invent someway of delivering a kiss & hug? (By machinery by luck, not by messenger) I don’t believe that would be such a good idea strike that one out. I’ll try to be there in person for such favors. What is if I would be so lucky as to receive any from the desirable lady.

About your idea on love. It’s very good and very idealistic. I might say that the love you desire to attain some day will be a very wonderful thing for a man. I wonder how many women can keep such an unfailing love though. I’ve seen so many, seemingly perfect, love affairs and marriages go on the rocks after a few months or years. There are so many stumbling blocks. Surely you are entitled to a very good husband. You must be very sure he is, before you give him a love like that which you say you desire to give. – More later-

Later – same day 11:00 p.m. July 6, 1932
Darling, I just couldn’t resist writing a few more lines before going to bed. You see I think as much about you that I just have to sit down and scribe a few words to the sweetest girl in the world.

I shocked myself today when I went through a lot of my old letters. My! The change is rather terrific was really as bashful (and no win the ones I reasoned) that I wonder how I changed. I have some from as far back as 1921. Evelyn flirted writing when she left in 1923 & as I have some from her from that time or until March 1932 (since that none) quite a pile. Then I read the ‘mushy’ letters Maude Kramer wrote me last year. That goes to show how fickle girls are. She must have not meant a word she said or else she changed a powerful lot. I like the ones from Bina were raking funny in the odd sort of way guess I’ve known the whole ‘shebang’ this getting to be a nuisance.  I have a nice little place for them where no one can get them, but it seemed a desecration to let the ones I receive from you to lie there by them. Yours are the only ones who seem to really mean anything to me the others are just so much paper and dried ink. Yours are you, your thoughts, and your soul. See! They mean a lot to me Dot. Don’t let anything stop one of them they are what I live upon up here in the sticks.

Good night, for a while old sweet. I’m going to bed & dream of hikes, tennis, shores and wonderful evenings with Dotty Smith in dear old Salt Lake City. Just this before I go. XXX
Ellsworth

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Ellsworth and Dorothy on a tennis date at Pioneer Park in Salt Lake City, Utah. Spring 1932.

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[Dorothy to Ellsworth, 10 July 1932]
[…] Did you say you would skate with me next winter? Hot dog! You’re the 1st in a thousand I’ve asked that has been on ice before. (And I don’t mean in cold storage – I’m there right now.) […]

As I glance at you recent salutations and endings I corroborate your supposition that if you once wrote bashful letters you certainly have changed. Talk about flattering phrases, you letters are the most contaminated I’ve ever received from the make of the species. I’ve got correspondences dating back to 1921 lying around, I mean a few rare old specimens. From 1927 till the present I’ve had at least 5 male correspondents in more recent years as many as 8 at a time but do you think I ever allowed anything like you write? I held them down till they were afraid to take the chance of being so daring. Before we moved from 1st North I burned about 200 of those old letters but kept at least one sample of each of them to read over and smile at in my old age. Sometime I’ll get them out and let you see them – and if you haven’t destroyed those of yours keep a few to show me. We’ll stage a court scene and see who can get the most evidence against the other for breach of promise, pretending some of these letters are more recent than they really are. Now I don’t know – I’m afraid I’d lose, but then what have I promised? Still free, am I not?

Dorothy to Ellsworth, 25 January 1934

Dorothy to Ellsworth, 25 January 1934

[Today is Ellsworth’s birthday! Read the newsy letter his fiancé wrote to him, and why she turned down Torleif Knaphus’s invite to the Beaux Arts Ball. -Cathy Gilmore]

2368 Highland Dr
S.L.C Utah
Jan 245/34

Good Morning Merry Sunshine!

How do you feel today? A beautiful, coral-streaked opal sky heralds the dawn of your Birthday Anniversary. The cool, crisp air promises continued winter for us.

Yesterday morning we rose to see the world blanketed in the heaviest snow of the season. The trees—a varied collection of weeping willows bowed reluctantly under their heavy burden, wires were rope-like in appearance and the general appearance was as tho a fairy had touched the landscape with her magic wand strewing the skyline with a lacy network of white branches.

Today enough snow remains on the trees to disguise them as cotton plants—what a frivolous climate.

I’m hoping your birthday joys were complete. Am sending my present today along with one from Knaphus. Eleven in all. You can buy a car with it if you like or a radio or a train ticket for a weekend in S.L.C.

I will be celebrating tonight by doing some sealings in Temple tonight as it is also Grandma Bushman’s birth anniversary & a group of us are going including Vera. Tomorrow night I am helping put over a pageant depicting N.D.A. growth and Saturday Olive & I & June & 3 other of the Knaphuses are doing some baptismal work.

Vera and I had to postpone our missionary meeting but hope to get started next week.

What did you think of the proposition we had to offer. Don’t drop it from your mind without due consideration will you?

Do you hear from Lewis? You know I was just thinking the coincidence it was that you and he should both get Arizona girls. Come to think of it she may even be a relation  – everyone else around there is. Now I have it! If she lives around Taylor she must be related to Vera for Vera was born there & it’s the home of he[r] Father’s folks. Ha! who said we weren’t a smart bunch. Tying a not [sic] right around the 3 couples of us. And Gene Murphy is related to some Smiths in S.L. I’ve got to look that up.

Now for my diary incidentally it is sadly neglected.

Stayed with Vera Sun. night. Monday night skipped school & sent to dinner at Eight with Torleif and Olive. Honestly honey. I was too tired to study  he had been wanting one to chum more with Olive so I felt rather obliged. Please forgive?

Tuesday night I attended a Stake Mutual party on Stratford Ave. with Oliver.

It was a grand affair & the most fun I’ve had in ages.

Tomorrow night (Fri) Don & Oliver have dates from for Granite Gold & Green Ball.

Knaphus has his car back & says it is at my service. Would I like to have a week end off? Better watch for me hiding under one of the seats in your Sunday School.

Rec’d letters the other day from Marv & one of his old girlfriends simultaneously. Marv’s enjoying life, what with a dance now & then & now & then a new good-looking ‘frill!

Virgil is well now & is back into mischief again.

Connie is still undecided. I have a 50¢ order from her to make a Valentine for John. Didn’t think I’d be making them for other men did you? This coming Sat. the Art Barn sponsors are staging their first annual Beaux Arts Ball — a grand costume affair.

Last night T.S.K. called for me at school and asked if I would care to go. Didn’t say definitely but a ‘couple’ is a ‘couple’ and I’d rather ensure my social standing than my artistic one so I’m waiting till I get a personal invitation from the committee at which time (if ever) you will be the other party. How’s that?

It’s lunch hour now. We’re certainly busy at Kress. S.H. arrives Mon Tues the 30th!

Burbidge tells me his son, Smith leaves Feb. 22 for Western States mission. He may even be your companion. Watch for him.

Edna Remington (office girl) says her sweetheart ‘Wid’ Davidson presided over that branch about 2 yrs ago & that he organized the original basketball team there.

I still see Aunt Annie Folsom upstairs now & then. She sends her best wishes to you & always asks about you. She tries to check up on my behavior & says I look better than at Xmas time.

I saw Helen, Iris & your mother for awhile yesterday.

Time’s up See you tonight under that big bright moon. Where’s that birthday kiss? Here’s mine “X” [stylized “x”]

Forever,

Dorothy

Figure this out & don’t ask me. [underneath looped lines leading up to her name]

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Ellsworth to Dorothy, 24 June 1932

Ellsworth to Dorothy, 24 June 1932

[Ellsworth is in Georgetown, Idaho on summer break from his studies in Salt Lake City. He is looking for work and missing Dorothy. You may note the absence of Dorothy’s letters. We know she sent him replies, but she had apparently discarded some letters she sent Ellsworth. Spelling an punctuation (a particular vice of Ellsworth’s) have not been corrected. -CG]

Georgetown Idaho
June 24, 1932

Mein Leibes Schatzie, (you said once you did not care if I said that)

There is a new word for you to learn. (schatzli) I couldn’t remember it for the longest time, but it came like a shot this morning. I shaved today and that could be a good reason for an approiate [sic] word to come to me. You see I had not shaven for a week. Well, you should have seen me. I looked like a porcupine. I’ve been weeding garden and hoeing again today, and believe me it’s plenty hot. We have almost as not weather here as they do in Salt Lake during the day, but thank the lucky stars it cools off in the evening.

I couldn’t get all the french in the last two letters, but I will before long. Also I want to ask you what you meant when you said “Noth kent kein gebot” OH! I see now I’ve written it down, only it seems that I can’t quite make out the noth. It means some sort of extremis knows no law. The other expression you used meant ‘To me it is all the same’ (mir ist alles emerlei[?])

So you don’t give a ‘hoot’ whether your letters are interesting or not. Is that what you mean? Gee! they are always interesting to me, but I hope that you cared whether they were or not. You surely are funny sometimes. You change so quickly. did you know that it is been forever that Carbolic acid has been formed to be mostly a bluff anyways it’s not really as effective as once thought.

Oh! Well! ‘doh de doh’ It looks like i have to toughen myself and not let things worry me.

Say, about the snaps. They should be here any day and there as soon as possible. I’ll send them to you. I hope that is soon.

The dance what was scheduled for tomorrow evening has been postponed until Tuesday. I wish they would make up their minds. I am pretty stiff now though, and a few days to loosen up a bit will help. I don’t know what I’ll loosen up for though. It seems that I’m not so crazy about the idea as at first.

Say, in those crazy dreams you have where I’m around some other woman, all you had better do is to remember that dreams go in opposites. That would make things much nicer for me.

You must not get any dream ideas of me running arosn around with someone else’s wife. When I take a girl out I hope that she does not foul me by making me believe things that she has already told someone else. I guess I’m funny that way. If you want to get rid of me, just get married, divorce your husband and come around. I’ll probably say “Yes dear I love you more than ever” (like heck I will) I wouldn’t say it anyway.

Now I think I’ll sign my name

Pure Concentrated Sulfuric Acid Clark

Now forget all that, I guess I’m just a little piqued at the way you ended your letter. The beginning was so good and the end so- so. Not at all like the Old German Proverb “Wie die Anfang zu die Ende” (How the beginning so to the end)

I guess the beginning was too good so the end had to compensate.

Anyway, I guess such things are the spice of life. Keep it up, just so there is compensation as much one way as the other.

It’s funny how a fellow reads things into letters. When I sat down to write your letter seemed the best ever and the more I read it the more I read into it. I guess I had better put it away and read it again when in better humor.

I wish I could see  you tonight and talk to you . I’ve so much to say that will seem funny on paper. I’m afraid I’m a pretty poor correspondent card You might read things into it also. Then lets hope that I’ll get better in my writing, become I guess its improbable that I’ll see you soon. Oh. Dot. Now here I am getting ‘blue’ etc.

I’ll cut this rotten letter short and hope that the next one is very much better.

Auf wieder sehen to the sweetest girl in the whole world

Repentantly

Ellsworth

Don’t worry about the ‘can de vil’ and the contemporaries. I have promised.

[circle with X inside] (not habitual)

believe as you will about the sentiment you know me better than most people I believe

EMC-DS-1932-06-24